Artist talk with Codomo Giura
yukio4.jpeg

'YUKIO4', 2021

Photo collage, print

29.7x40cm

Tell us about yourself.

I am Codomo Giura, contemporary artist. Codomo in Japanese means - “kid”. I was born in Japan in 1994, in 2019 I moved to Spain and I'm currently based in Tokyo. I create photograph collages, video arts, and so on exhibited with sophisticated graphic designs. My graphics are collaborated with a Japanese graphic designer called 'ZUANCOMONG'. I also work as a graphic and textile designer, mainly for clothes.

Where did your passion for art begin?

As a child I was into drawing Japanese Anime characters and making Origami way more than playing outside with the other kids. I also played the piano since I was 4 years old. I don't know if I got a passion from music at that time though.

I remember I was an introverted kid and not comfortable with other girls, I think I could not make them comfortable with me too. It was difficult for me to get used to my surroundings when I started to go to school,

I preferred to immerse myself into my thoughts. I used to think about the basic wonders of this world like what I live for, who I am, what this world is and things like that. Sometimes things are not so easy for this kind of kids.

I was observing the wall in my room when I was sad and often I looked for interesting shapes on the wall texture and thought about what they looked like. 

Moreover, I had sleep paralysis and out-of-body experiences quite a lot especially when I was a teenager. I think this sort of vague feeling between the real and imagination also affects my creativity.  

ikiru.jpeg

'YUKIO', 2021

Photo collage, print

84.1x118.9cm

How would you describe your work to someone?

Life and memory

 

What are you currently working on?

I am currently working on a new project. It started from one chicken picture and I'm just done with the first look.

I plan to transform the look to something between digital and analog. 

I also have one more ongoing project, which is a video installation with one piano player.

yukio5.jpeg

When you start a new work or project, do you plan what you’re going to create or do you improvise? 

I don’t remember exactly how I usually start my artwork. I think I get my inspiration from my surroundings out of curiosity. Sometimes an image flushes into my head. In this case, I could just follow the idea. However, most of my work begins from a lot of my research and deep thoughts. Thinking about a theme is a fun moment of a creation and it is also impressive that the theme can be changed while I create and even exhibit.

'YUKIO5', 2021

Photo collage, print

29.7x42cm

Can you highlight some of your influences and discuss how your influences have made an impact on you and your practice?

One Japanese media artist and educator called Tomoko Mukai influenced me a lot. She was my professor when I was a student at the university. I’ve taken my art seriously since I've met her, she led me to realize what I really want to express. At the same time, I met one talented graphic designer called ZUANCOMONG. His designs and his attitude to his work enhanced my creativity a lot. In addition, Christian Boltanski's solo exhibition: lifetime was so impressive. 

Also, one of my family members has been in a medical condition that causes memory loss. I could not help thinking about memories and identity. The experience with my family is strongly connected to the theme of my art. 

riyokobb.jpeg

'RIYOKO Before Birth', 2021

Photo collage, print

42x59.4cm

What are your plans for the remainder of this year?

My family has run the traditional ferry business which is the last Japanese traditional boat called Wasen still working in Tokyo. I remember I used to watch the movement of water when my grandfather rowed the boat. This special environment has inspired me and I am getting interested in this old culture more and more as I get older. I want to collaborate with Wasen someday.